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Trolls Who Hate Bitcoin

For unknown reason$ a large number of online accounts began harping on Bitcoin and trying to change it from the concepts that made it work. Here we document those Trouble makers who remain to "Troll" people when from any logical point of view they have no reason to remain (and often to repeat easily disproven opinions), unless they hate Bitcoin.
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United Kingdom Cryptocurrency Guidance

Cryptocurrency is digital currency which uses cryptography to secure transactions. Bitcoin became the first decentralized cryptocurrency in 2009, since then the number of cryptocurrencies has increased rapidly with many hundred currently available Learn more at ukcryptocurrency.com
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Number of Bitcoin transactions follows cubic trend

The blue graph in the following diagram shows the 28-day average of the daily number of bitcoin transactions (see blockchain.info).
http://i.imgur.com/VTXkmpC.png
The inserted red curve models the long term trend of the Bitcoin transaction numbers quite well. Yet the underlying formula is very simple.
Be m the number of months since the 1st January 2010. The number of transactions t after month m is calculated as
t(m) = 0.4 x (m3 - m2 )
Example:
The 1st January 2015 is exactly 60 months after the 1st January 2010. Thus the formula yields:
0.4 x (603 - 602 ) = 84,960
The real value of the 28-day transaction average on that day is 84,866.
If the number of transactions follows the hitherto observed trend, one would expect the following future numbers:
1st January 2016: 147,226
1st January 2017: 234,259
1st January 2020: 685,440
submitted by ngt_ to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

[PDF] Tracking Mixed Bitcoins - Our finding shows that it is possible to track the mixed Bitcoins from the deposited Bitcoins using address taint analysis and the number of potential transaction outputs can be significantly reduced with the filtering criteria

submitted by DeoVolente11 to computerforensics [link] [comments]

The number of unconfirmed transactions in the Bitcoin network at highest level

The Bitcoin network has slowed down amid new price peaks.
According to Blockchain.com, on October 27, the number of unconfirmed Bitcoin transactions surpassed 100,000. This is the highest level since the end of 2017, when the price of bitcoin was at an all-time high near $20,000.
Then the indicator reached 180,000 transactions. The volume of unconfirmed transactions is growing against the background of the BTC price reaching new multi-month highs. On October 27, the first cryptocurrency rose in price to $ 13'840 dollars, updating the peak of two and a half years on a number of exchanges.
submitted by bestchange_pr to bestchange [link] [comments]

[PDF] Tracking Mixed Bitcoins - Our finding shows that it is possible to track the mixed Bitcoins from the deposited Bitcoins using address taint analysis and the number of potential transaction outputs can be significantly reduced with the filtering criteria

submitted by digicat to blueteamsec [link] [comments]

Does using my own phone number for verification link my name to the transaction at a Bitcoin atm?

Pretty sure the answer is yes but just making sure
submitted by CardiacLover to BitcoinBeginners [link] [comments]

09-19 00:47 - '"Round Numbers" transaction privacy' (self.Bitcoin) by /u/YouTubeFacebook removed from /r/Bitcoin within 2-12min

'''
Sent a transaction earlier that was a round number and saw the Blockstream explorer gives a privacy warning about it that links to this page [[link]2
Just curious if there's a better explanation of this concept? I've been in bitcoin for a long time, never heard about this so was just curious. I always assumed using extremely precise transactions would be less private?
'''
"Round Numbers" transaction privacy
Go1dfish undelete link
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Author: YouTubeFacebook
1: en.bi*c***.**/wiki/*riv*cy#Rou*d_nu*bers 2: en.bitc**n.it/wiki/*r*vac*#*ou*d\*n*m*ers]^*1
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Would it be possible to attack the bitcoin network by creating a very high number of (micro)transactions?

Would it be possible to attack the bitcoin network by creating a very high number of (micro)transactions? I have little idea about the tech behind bitcoin, but wouldn't the pool of transactions be cluttered and sending money would take much longer for everybody as a result?
submitted by nick-bravo to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

Would it be possible to get a btc unconfirmed transactions counter on bitcoin.com? Only since blockchain got rid of theirs, and that number is kind of a BCH KPI.

submitted by BenIntrepid to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin daily active addresses (defined as the unique number of addresses either sending or receiving a transaction) are approaching levels not seen since 2018.

Bitcoin daily active addresses (defined as the unique number of addresses either sending or receiving a transaction) are approaching levels not seen since 2018. submitted by Shudip_47 to ico [link] [comments]

Please note that it is only considered safe to proceed with the payment if the transaction has reached the required number of confirmations, and the Bitcoin is safely locked in escrow.

Please note that it is only considered safe to proceed with the payment if the transaction has reached the required number of confirmations, and the Bitcoin is safely locked in escrow. submitted by AnnaHodlHodl to hodlhodl [link] [comments]

Number of confirmed Bitcoin transactions per day hits highest level since last bull run

Number of confirmed Bitcoin transactions per day hits highest level since last bull run submitted by coinsmash1 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

The Number of Unconfirmed Transactions on Bitcoin Network Surges - Crypto Press

The Number of Unconfirmed Transactions on Bitcoin Network Surges - Crypto Press submitted by cryptoallbot to cryptoall [link] [comments]

05-18 10:34 - 'The problem will come to a head well before then. You can see now, that the network doesn't have enough capacity to support the transaction numbers. The memepool has been overflowing for days, so you have to compete via fees...' by /u/barnz3000 removed from /r/Bitcoin within 93-103min

'''
The problem will come to a head well before then. You can see now, that the network doesn't have enough capacity to support the transaction numbers. The memepool has been overflowing for days, so you have to compete via fees.
This is a choice that was made, to limit the blocksize, and "scale" using sidechains. I don't agree with the choice. But it was one option.
There are "no free lunches" network has to be secured, and someone has to pay for that. We pay via inflation now (block reward), but fees are a certainty.
Though I would also argue there are better options than proof of work, which squanders a reckless amount of electricity.
'''
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submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

Why Bitcoin can't become Digital Gold

Nowadays there's a common misconception that mining cost affects the price of Bitcoin. Only the opposite is true. Basic economics implies that the mining cost will follow the price of Bitcoin. Transaction numbers and speed can affect the price but don't have direct ties to mining cost.
Assuming Bitcoin would become a gold-like standard with about 10 trillion dollars of capitalization there's no doubt that this would result in mining facilities consuming a big chunk of the world's energy supply. Although there've been significant economic inefficiencies in the past I can't and don't want to see that happen.
Neither Bitcoin nor any other POW coin will reach that standard, unless these coins drastically reduce mining rewards (which actually can be changed).
Edit: I'm a nerd and crypto enthusiast, probably just like you. Don't take critical posts too emotional and tribalistic and try to argue rationally.
submitted by B1t1nat0r to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

PayFast Ending support for BTC: "there are a number of limitations and design flaws unique to Bitcoin [BTC] that make it an impractical substitute for cash, including high transaction fees and long confirmation times for buyers"

PayFast Ending support for BTC: submitted by unstoppable-cash to btc [link] [comments]

If you have any use-case or a raison d’être other than peer to peer electronic cash, you’re not Bitcoin. Bitcoin Cash is the only continuation of Bitcoin as peer to peer electronic cash with the scalability of onchain cash transactions being the number one concern of the network and its main driver

Dear BTC user blaming wallet softwares for the fees. What you’re blaming on the wallet software is actually an unsolvable problem, from a mathematical perspective.
You cannot predict a fee, but the network should churn through most transactions and their fees until it can’t anymore, and then there’s an incentive to grow the network infrastructure more in order to accommodate more transactions per block, with the focus on peer to peer electronic cash as a utility first and foremost.
If you have any other use case other than peer to peer electronic cash, you’re not Bitcoin.
If you have any reason or limitation forbidding you from growing your chain competitively as to include the very last Satoshi-paying transaction in the next block, you’re not Bitcoin.
Bitcoin is a sophisticated system demonstrating an ideal game-theory’s Nash Equilibrium, and it is also in perfect sync with classical economics: Time Value of Money - no sane miner would leave Satoshis in a memory-pool unmined while they can instead mine those Satoshis and start investing them right away.
Unless of course their version of Bitcoin (BTC) is broken and doesn’t allow them to do anything else besides sit and wait for the next 1 or 2 meg block.
Bitcoin Cash is the only continuation of Bitcoin as peer to peer electronic cash with the scalability of those cash transactions being the number one concern of the network and its main driver.
submitted by wisequote to btc [link] [comments]

Vinny Lingham: "I totally agree and have been saying this for a while. 1mb is an arbitrary number and if Bitcoin is going to rely on L2 to scale, then it makes no sense to keep it at 1mb. Reducing it to 350k as per the research from @LukeDashjr is practical and can help move transactions to L2."

Vinny Lingham: submitted by Egon_1 to btc [link] [comments]

Bitcoin hits the highest number of transactions in 2019 + Lightning Lapps are here and adoption is spreading!

Bitcoin hits the highest number of transactions in 2019 + Lightning Lapps are here and adoption is spreading! submitted by Eloquence25 to CryptoCurrency [link] [comments]

02-28 12:05 - 'Derp. He states that over 40% of Bitcoin transactions are illicit, when the actual number [is about 0.5%]. He states that the U.S. dollar can do everything except enable drug dealers, tax dodgers, etc., when it is wel...' by /u/Always_Question removed from /r/Bitcoin within 399-409min

'''
Derp. He states that over 40% of Bitcoin transactions are illicit, when the actual number [is about 0.5%]1 . He states that the U.S. dollar can do everything except enable drug dealers, tax dodgers, etc., when it is well known that the currency of choice for criminals and terrorists is the U.S. dollar. He states that crypto is useless besides illicit behaviors, while ignoring the fact that crypto provides a confiscation-resistant, inflation-resistant, store of value, or that you can [earn up to 8% interest per year on a stable coin like DAI]2 . Try doing that with U.S. dollars.
'''
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Author: Always_Question
1: upl**ds-**l.*ebf**w.c*m*5a9360f8843**b0**18022c2/*c4f67e*7deb594*e29*1*da_Chai*aly**s%*0January%2***19*20C*ypto%20*ri*e*20R**ort.*df 2: oasi*.app*sa**
Unknown links are censored to prevent spreading illicit content.
submitted by removalbot to removalbot [link] [comments]

You currently would have to do 1800 BTC transactions on the lightning network to break-even over doing the same number of transactions on Bitcoin Cash.

I calculated the break even point in this old post analyzing the usefulness of the Lightning Network
As of post-time, in order to get a spot in the next block, the network requires a fee of around 80sat/byte
BCH will still confirm a 1sat/byte transaction next-block.
The cost to open a channel with a single input, 2-output transaction using SegWit Bech32 transaction is currently at least 90¢. This does not include any close or force close scenarios.
I will also not include any fees from the lightning network and assume they are negligible. If the LN does expand, I don't know how long this assumption will stand.
The cost to transact on the Bitcoin Cash network with a 1-input 2-output transaction is currently around .05¢. That's not 5 cents... that's 5 one-hundredths of one penny.
You currently would have to make 1800 transactions on a newly created channel to break even.
To those wondering "what happens if BCH has the same price as BTC:" If BCH had a current-day price of $6,250, Assuming no other changes, that same transaction in BCH would cost 1.4¢ and you would still need to do 65 transactions on the same channel to break even.
That's if miners don't start accepting fractional fees for each block (e.g. 0.5sat/byte or 0.1sat/byte) which has been on the table in the past. This will become more realistic as the price rises. A realistic assumption would be 2-10x that amount should that level of price increase happen.
Regardless: Open channels responsibly.
submitted by CaptainPatent to btc [link] [comments]

The number of transactions on BitCoin increases at the level of Bitcoin Core and fees are still much lower. #Winning

The number of transactions on BitCoin increases at the level of Bitcoin Core and fees are still much lower. #Winning submitted by Egon_2 to bitcoincashSV [link] [comments]

I've been using and evangelizing Bitcoins and the idea of cryptocurrencies in general for 5 years now. Recently, I've been troubled by some issues with energy consumption, deflation and the lack of real arguments or numbers, or even discussion about if these problems will get better, or get worse.

Let me preface this again by saying I've been a bitcoin user and vocal supporter since 2010. I am a privacy advocate, and member of the EFF. This is a sincere post from someone who wants cryptocurrencies to succeed, but is worried about some things that no one seems to be talking about. Let me summarize the points:
  1. The Bitcoin network has, and always will, consume energy that costs about as much as the mining reward is worth. All other variables like hashes per watt efficiency improvements, total hash rate, and difficulty are totally irrelevant. The same is true for transaction fees: the value of the energy consumed will be about equal to the value of aggregate rewards for mining. Here is a detailed analysis for you number junkies.
  2. As the rewards are essentially locked to the valuation of 1 bitcoin (and transaction fees will remain negligible until the last block of coins is mined), so to is the energy consumption of the network locked to the valuation. The energy consumption of the bitcoin network is locked to the market value of a bitcoin at the time it is mined.
  3. The oft-mentioned argument that deflation is not a problem for bitcoin because it is highly divisible assumes that the deflation of bitcoins' value otherwise behaves like deflation of hugely divisible fiat currency. That assumption is false. Deflation has the very tangible and significant impact in the form of the value of total energy consumed by the bitcoin network. Is that ok? What impact will that have? I have no idea, but I'm worried because no one else is talking about it either. I would love if someone with the economist chops could tell me why this is, or isn't really a problem.
  4. All the arguments I've seen justifying the energy cost of the bitcoin network are nonsense. The main rebuttal is that fiat currencies consume much more energy. Bitcoin transactions number in the ~120,000-130,000 per day, as of this writing. Fiat currencies account for all other currency transactions, outnumbering the bitcoin network's transactions by 5 or 6 orders of magnitude. Of course fiat currency consumes more power! The number that actually matters is the energy cost per transaction. It's difficult (for me at least) to estimate the energy cost per transaction of, say, an average bank account transaction across the different forms they can take (debit, deposit, electronic, ATM, debit card, check etc.), but FDIC reports generally show most transactions to cost a bank 7 or 8 cents, with ATM transactions being the most expensive at 20-24 cents. I think we can safely assume that whatever the energy cost is, it is less than those costs, or is otherwise countered by real economic value generated. If it wasn't, being a bank wouldn't be profitable.
  5. How much the various social and political benefits of bitcoin are worth to you don't matter. If you want to pay $6 a transaction for that, great. You do that. Privacy and decentralization, while I agree I find personally quite valuable, are still subjective opinions and not valid justifications for the cost.
  6. The biggest point: that energy is consumed for no reason. What I mean by that is cryptographic hashing is a time/memory trade off. The proof-of-work for bitcoin is heavily slanted towards time: the faster you can hash, the better. And you know what? We're really good at making computation so cheap that ultimately, it's just obfuscating that bitcoin's proof-of-work is value of energy consumed. Beyond that, all technological development surrounding bitcoin mining is totally useless except for bitcoin mining. Mining hardware cannot be repurposed for anything else. If, instead, a memory-intensive rather than time-intensive hashing algorithm were used, then things would be very different. At the very least, bitcoin mining would contribute to advances in memory or bulk storage space, which is universally useful. As for the energy consumption, I am not equipped to speculate on that, but it seems like hardware cost would become the limiting factor, but how much energy was consumed producing that hardware? Who knows. I think this is the point of litecoin, which uses a memory intensive hash called scrypt. Regardless, I want to know, what is the justification for squandering energy like this, when all the benefits and capabilities of the block chain can be had using a ASIC-resistant hashing algorithm?
I know this was really long. These are concerns, what I am hoping is for people to discuss them and, ideally, do some real math that tackles these concerns and shows them to not be problems. I want you guys to tell me why I'm wrong (and trust me, I want to be wrong!). And be sure that these issues will start to become greater and ask by others as the value of bitcoin (and its energy consumption) increases, so at the very least, let's have the answers ready. Thanks for reading! If you did ;).
submitted by metacollin to Bitcoin [link] [comments]

How to Find a Bitcoin Transaction ID in Your Coinbase ... Blockchain Unconfirmed Transactions #blockchain #cryptocurrency #btc Constructing a Bitcoin transaction using python - 3/5 Bitcoin Transaction (VJ Edition) Coinbase hash Transaction ID

Bitcoin puts the current compact-format target and the arbitrary-precision "extraNonce" number there, which increments every time the Nonce field in the block header overflows. Outputs can be anything, but Bitcoin creates one exactly like an IP address transaction. The extranonce contributes to enlarge the domain for the proof of work function. Miners can easily modify nonce (4byte), timestamp ... Number of Bitcoin Transactions Are Down to 2018 Levels. March 31, 2020 4:22 pm by Mati Greenspan. 518 Investors read this. Even though Bitcoin itself can’t catch Coronavirus, it seems that just like many things in our rapidly changing society we’re now seeing the affects of Covid-19 play out in Bitcoin’s network. As far as on-chain ... Bitcoin Core and many other tools print and accept raw transactions encoded as hex. As of Bitcoin Core 0.9.3 (October 2014), all transactions use the version 1 format described below. (Note: transactions in the block chain are allowed to list a higher version number to permit soft forks, but they are treated as version 1 transactions by current ... All Bitcoin transactions must be verified by miners on the blockchain. Note, miners do not mine transactions; they mine blocks which are collections of transactions. Sometimes your transaction gets left out of the current block and gets put on hold until the next one is assembled. The Bitcoin protocol dynamically adjusts requirements to have each block take approximately 10 minutes to mine ... The number of daily confirmed transactions highlights the value of the Bitcoin network as a way to securely transfer funds without a third part. Notes Transactions are accounted for only once they are included in a block.

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How to Find a Bitcoin Transaction ID in Your Coinbase ...

Charts description: - Timezone: GMT+0 - Relative change: Percentage change of total transaction count last 30 seconds - Percentage between Buy and Sell Trans... Do you send Bitcoins from your Blockchain.Info wallet? Do you often get asked to send the "Receiver/Recipient" the proof of payment, especially the Hash/Tran... How to confirm payment with blockchain hash code in Global Help Community www.globalhelp.fund - Duration: 5:11. Global Help Community Global Help Community 7,381 views This video is for people who want to use (almost) raw python code to Constructing a Bitcoin transaction. In the previous videos, I've explained how to connect to the bitcoin network, as well as ... How To Check My Number Of Bitcoin Confirmations Using Luno Wallet Zukul Sign Up https://goo.gl/MHcD4t How To Earn $1,000 - $10,000 Monthly http://onlinestuff...

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