Convert Bitcoin To PayPal - Instant Exchange - +Bitcoin

Initiating a bank transfer or Paypal from Vietcombank without being in the country?

Even though I worked legally and could theoretically do an international wire transfer, I'm leaving Vietnam on the 24th and get paid (probably 20M dong / $900) on the 1st, so that's not an option because I won't be able to physically go to a VCB agency.
I could pray that my debit card works internationally and then withdraw small amounts every day in Japan/Brazil/Philippines, but that incurs steep fees (I'm assuming $5 per transaction with a $100 transaction limit which would amount to just shy of $50 or 1.1M dong in total fees). Not to mention that ATMs are often very finicky with international debit cards.
So one thing that I'm considering is buying Bitcoin. I found a website that accepts VND and has much cheaper fees than the debit card method above. It doesn't seem 100% safe, but beggars can't be choosers. It accepts bank transfers and Paypal as methods of payment, so my question is, can I easily use one of those to extract my VND from my VCB account without being in Vietnam? Or in other words:
Thanks!
submitted by Malarazz to VietNam [link] [comments]

PrivateVPN Review - A real shocker

PrivateVPN doesn’t shy away from talking itself up on its website. It makes a whole bunch of bold claims, such as it being the “fastest growing VPN worldwide”.
PrivateVPN also promises to “unlock anything, protect everything” – that’s just what we like to see from a VPN service, but can it possibly deliver on such strong claims?
We put PrivateVPN to the test hoping to answer that question, plus:
Does PrivateVPN work with Netflix? Where is PrivateVPN located? Does PrivateVPN work in China? What is Stealth VPN? And, of course, is PrivateVPN any good? Our unbiased and in-depth review will explain all, but if you’re in a rush you can find our key takeaways just below. Pros Consistently fast speeds No logging & no IP, DNS & WebRTC leaks Works with Netflix, BBC iPlayer & more Torrenting/P2P allowed on all VPN servers Choose from VPN servers in 59 countries User-friendly apps for PC, Mac, iOS, & Android Cons Small number of individual VPN servers No browser VPN extensions No native app for Linux Live chat not always available Works with
Netflix, Amazon Prime Video, Hulu, BBC iPlayer, Sky, HBO, Torrenting, Kodi
Available on
Windows Mac Ios Android Linux Price from
$2.88/mo
PrivateVPN is one of the best VPNs on the market, there’s no doubt about it. It’s fast, safe and tantalizingly cheap – but it’s not without its flaws. Read on to find out just what to look out for.
Speed & Reliability Very fast speeds across the server network
PrivateVPN provides consistently fast speeds across its VPN server network. Reliably quick uploads and downloads are ideal for both secure torrenting and buffer-free streaming.
Connecting to a same-country server (UK to UK), PrivateVPN only slowed our internet connection down by about 7%.
PrivateVPN is one of the fastest VPNs available – if speed is what you want then it’s a serious contender.
Speed results from our physical location in London (100Mbps fibre optic connection) to a London test server.
Before using PrivateVPN:
DOWNLOAD Mbps 92.94
UPLOAD Mbps 97.54
PING ms 3
When connected to PrivateVPN:
DOWNLOAD Mbps 86.7
UPLOAD Mbps 88.94
PING ms 5
Download speed without PrivateVPN: 92.94Mbps
Download speed with PrivateVPN: 86.70Mbps
Our download speed loss when PrivateVPN is running: 7%
Ping times are low (great for gamers) and upload speeds are high (great for torrenters).
Even across international connections, such as the UK to the US, PrivateVPN is pretty speedy – you’ll be able to do pretty much anything online without breaking a sweat.
Take a look at the average download and upload speeds we recorded connecting out from the UK to PrivateVPN’s servers:
USA: 63Mbps (download) & 25Mbps (upload) Germany: 86Mbps (download) & 56Mbps (upload) Singapore: 32Mbps (download) & 15Mbps (upload) Australia: 18Mbps (download) & 13Mbps (upload) Server Locations Just 150 VPN servers cover 59 countries
Globe with a blue flag 59 Countries Image of a city landscape 75 Cities Image of a pink marker 7,000+ IP Addresses See all Server Locations PrivateVPN’s array of locations (59 countries) and VPN servers is nowhere near the highest we’ve seen, but it’s not as poor as it may first look.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN's beta server list
PrivateVPN offers more than 7,000 individual IP addresses so, despite maintaining just the 150 or so VPN servers, you shouldn’t have to worry about facing congestion or slowdown.
Those 150 VPN servers also do a pretty good job of providing worldwide coverage. There are servers in popular locations like the US, Canada, Australia, and loads of countries in Western Europe, but PrivateVPN also provides plenty of choice in South America and Asia-Pacific.
Those in South and Central America can connect to VPN servers in Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, and Panama.
While Asia has VPN servers in Hong Kong, Indonesia, Israel, India, Japan, South Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Taiwan, Vietnam, and the United Arab Emirates.
Disappointingly, Africa is covered by South Africa alone.
PrivateVPN provides city-level choice in eight countries, which is great for experiencing the best speeds:
Australia (2) Canada (2) India (2) Italy (2) Sweden (3) the UK (2) Ukraine (2) the US (9) PrivateVPN uses a mix of physical servers and virtual servers. It owns some of its servers and leases others. While this isn’t ideal, PrivateVPN ensures that those leased servers are not keeping user logs by setting them up themselves and monitoring the servers remotely.
Streaming & Torrenting Works reliably with Netflix, BBC iPlayer, Hulu, and more
PrivateVPN is one of the absolute best VPNs for streaming.
PrivateVPN makes streaming easy by organizing its locations list into servers optimized for accessing certain streaming services like Netflix and BBC iPlayer.
PrivateVPN also has dedicated VPN servers for 18 other streaming channels including:
Amazon Prime ESPN HBO Hulu Sky Torrenting PrivateVPN is a great VPN for torrenting, with P2P allowed on all servers, but there are special servers in 17 countries optimized for that purpose too. You can find these servers under ‘Dedicated IP/Torrent’ within the ‘By Service’ servers list.
PrivateVPN is one of the safest choices for torrenting due to its no-logs policy, host of security features, and fast uploads and downloads.
PrivateVPN is ideal for Kodi, too.
Bypassing Censorship Works reliably in China thanks to Stealth VPN protocol
PrivateVPN is a good VPN for China.
Its advanced privacy tools and Stealth VPN protocol, which hides the fact you’re using a VPN, meaning that PrivateVPN is one of our most reliable VPN choices for China – or for bypassing censorship in any other country, for that matter.
Thanks to the Stealth VPN feature, you can use PrivateVPN in the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey too. With plenty of servers in Asia, speeds should remain fast.
PrivateVPN also provides Tor over VPN if you’re looking for an extra layer of security.
Platforms & Devices Simple custom VPN apps for the main platforms
Apps Windows Logo Windows Mac Logo Mac iOS Logo iOS Android Logo Android Linux Logo Linux Router Logo Router PrivateVPN has custom VPN apps for the most popular platforms, including:
Microsoft Windows Apple MacOS iOS Android For any other platforms, like Linux, there are plenty of manual setup guides online to help you through it.
You can connect up to six devices at the same time, which makes PrivateVPN a good choice for those who want to protect not only their devices but their family’s too.
Games Consoles & Streaming Devices AppleTV Logo AppleTV Amazon Fire TV Logo Amazon Fire TV Chromecast Logo Chromecast Nintendo Logo Nintendo PlayStation Logo PlayStation Roku Logo Roku Xbox Logo Xbox On top of custom apps for the four most popular platforms, PrivateVPN provides solutions for smart TVs too.
PrivateVPN is one of very few providers to offer a dedicated VPN app for the Amazon Fire TV Stick, meaning all you have to do is download the app from the store and you’re ready to go.
In order to protect games consoles or any other streaming device, you’ll need to connect them to a configured router or another device running the PrivateVPN app, such as a laptop or smartphone.
Browser Extensions Unlike the majority of our other top-ranking VPNs, PrivateVPN has no browser extensions. This means that there are no add-ons for Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Opera, or Safari.
ExpressVPN, for example, provides full-featured VPN extensions for the most popular web browsers. VPN browsers tend to come with added WebRTC leak protection, but thankfully we didn’t experience any leaks during our PrivateVPN tests.
Encryption & Security Very secure VPN with plenty of configurable options
Protocol IKEv2/IPSec
L2TP/IPSec
OpenVPN (TCP/UDP)
PPTP
Encryption AES-256
Security DNS Leak Blocking
First-party DNS
IPV6 Leak Blocking
Supports TCP Port 443
VPN Kill Switch
Advanced features SOCKS
TOR via VPN Server
Please see our VPN Glossary if these terms confuse you and would like to learn more.
It’s not just a name – PrivateVPN really is a truly secure and safe VPN, with lots of advanced features in place to make sure your data and browsing habits are kept as private as possible.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Settings Menu in App
PrivateVPN provides near-uncrackable AES-256 encryption, the OpenVPN protocol – our personal favorite, and DNS servers operated by PrivateVPN so that your traffic doesn’t take any unexpected diversions.
You can choose to connect using other VPN protocols (PPTP and L2TP) but we don’t recommend them as they don’t provide the same level of security. In fact, PPTP is unsafe to use.
PrivateVPN has a VPN kill switch for Windows to keep you safe if your connection drops, but it’s missing for MacOS and mobile devices, which is disappointing.
Our thorough VPN testing detected no DNS or IPv6 leaks, and you can also use Tor over VPN or TCP Port 443 for even greater security.
Screenshot of leak test results for PrivateVPN PrivateVPN browserleaks.com test results while connected to a US server. We test from the UK.
Logging Policy Strict zero-logging policy mitigates EU jurisdiction
A VPN can’t truly be private unless it has a top-notch, robust logging policy. PrivateVPN claims that it “doesn’t collect or log any traffic or use of its service.”
That’s great – unfortunately, that one quote is also the full extent of it. We’d like the privacy policy to explicitly say that it doesn’t log DNS requests, connection timestamps, or IP addresses, but thankfully a support agent confirmed that PrivateVPN doesn’t collect this data.
Ultimately, we trust PrivateVPN to keep you safe, and you should too, but ideally we look for a little more information and clarification in a privacy policy, just for peace of mind.
Jurisdiction PrivateVPN was founded in 2009 and is owned by Privat Kommunikation AB, which operates under the jurisdiction of Sweden, making it subject to EU data retention laws and intelligence-sharing agreements.
However, PrivateVPN’s zero-logs policy means that even if it was asked to comply with any type of investigation, it doesn’t have any information about its VPN subscribers to give to the authorities, so there’s nothing for users to worry about.
Ease of Use Simple setup and user-friendly custom apps
How to Install & Set Up PrivateVPN Screenshot of PrivateVPN Download Button Go to the downloads section of the PrivateVPN website to begin the installation process.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Terms and Conditions You have to accept PrivateVPN's terms and conditions before you can install the software.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Installation Wizard Once you've accepted the terms, the VPN installation wizard will let you know once the installation is complete.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Completed Installation When the software has been installed, you'll be prompted to restart your machine before you can use the VPN.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Desktop App Main Screen The desktop VPN client is uncluttered and user-friendly, displaying your new IP address and chosen server location.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN's server list PrivateVPN's server list is arranged in alphabetical order by country name and displays the city name too.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN's streaming servers PrivateVPN makes streaming your favorite shows easy with a list of dedicated VPN servers.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Protocol Selection You can choose which VPN protocol you want to connect with, but OpenVPN is the default setting.
Screenshot of PrivateVPN Connection Guard The VPN connection guard tab allows you to toggle on/off features such as the kill switch and DNS leak blocking.
Downloading and installing PrivateVPN is incredibly easy and takes only a matter of minutes. There are step-by-step installation guides for loads of popular devices on the website if you need help.
PrivateVPN’s minimalist VPN apps do a great job of keeping things simple while simultaneously showcasing its more advanced features.
The desktop and mobile PrivateVPN apps are very similar in appearance, and everything is clearly labeled and accessible – although mobile users should beware that the Android and iOS versions are missing the kill switch.
PrivateVPN’s apps don’t provide integrated support, either, so newbies or those looking for assistance will need to head online for help.
Customer Support Useful online resources but live chat is inconsistent
Live chat Support Online Resources PrivateVPN does have a live chat help feature on its website, but it’s not available 24/7, which is less than ideal.
The chat box is either red or green depending on whether or not it’s available – there doesn’t seem to be any way to predict exactly when that will or won’t be. When it’s unavailable PrivateVPN brings up an online form instead.
Email replies to the online form are fairly quick, and the support agents are very knowledgable and friendly.
Even if the live chat isn’t active when you need it, PrivateVPN’s online resources and FAQs should be able to see you through most issues.
Pricing & Deals Super cheap VPN, especially on 15-month plan
PrivateVPN Coupon PrivateVPN logo PrivateVPN
Get 73% off with PrivateVPN's 15-month plan
TestedEnds 28 Aug Get CodeED Terms PrivateVPN Pricing Plan PrivateVPN is affordable with a sizable 73% saving available when taking out a 15-month plan. $2.88 per month for the duration is an extremely enticing price for a service the quality of PrivateVPN.
There are also shorter plans available, but these work out to be more expensive on a monthly basis.
Monthly
US$7.12/mo
Billed $10.95 for the first month Save 35% 3 Months
US$4.20/mo
Billed $12.60 for the first 3 months Save 61% 15 Months
US$2.88/mo
Billed $43.20 for the first 15 months Save 73% All plans have 30-day money-back guarantee
Payment & Refund Options Credit Card PayPal Bitcoin PrivateVPN accepts a fairly limited number of payment methods, but there is an option to pay in cryptocurrency for a higher level of privacy:
Major credit and debit cards PayPal Bitcoin PrivateVPN offers a seven-day free trial completely risk-free. You don’t need to provide any payment details, just an email address, and you’ll have full access to the service for a week.
There is also a 30-day money-back guarantee for all users, and the only conditional is that you use less than 100GB of data in the period.
You will need to provide a reason for asking for your money back, but all refunds are processed within five business days of them being requested if you have second thoughts.
submitted by Zinkzd to VPNsReddit [link] [comments]

Best of Buttcoin: 2014

There's been some fantastic work done in this subreddit spreading disinformation researching, criticising, and debunking bitcoin and its sacred cows over the past year, which I would like to celebrate.
So here's some posts I saved on bitcoin-related topics. But I started saving things too late... So if you have and/or remember any great posts from the past year, dig them up and post them here.
Also, unironically, maybe someone should start a buttcoin wiki

First, three pieces of investigative journalism from Buttcoin's top minds. Here Charlie_Shrem examines the environmental impact of bitcoin mining. Key finding: For every Bitcoin transaction, 47 kilograms of CO2 is released into the atmosphere from the miners alone.
Current hash rate: 261,900,382 GH/s
Number of transactions per day: 71,331
If we assume rather conservatively that 1GH/s = 1 watt on average, then this would mean 261,900,382W is being used to power the network. We can simplify this to 261,900 kW.
Some miners can do better than 1W per 1GH/s, but many if not most do worse (i.e. 2W per 1GH/s to 10W per 1GH/s).
Going by the figure of 0.527kg CO2 / kWh found on this page,
0.527kg CO2 x 261,900 kW x 24 hours = 3,312,511.2 kg CO2 per day
Now,
3,312,511.2 kg CO2 / 71,331 transactions = 46.44 kg CO2 per transaction
For comparison, even going by this Coindesk Article, an ATM produces daily 3.162kg in CO2 emissions.
0.25kwH x 0.527kg CO2 x 24 hours = 3.162kg/day.
That means that the carbon emission for one Bitcoin transaction is equivalent to about 15 ATMs processing perhaps hundreds or thousands of transactions in a day combined.

Earlier this month Frankeh abruptly interrupted remittance-focused annular onanism by issuing a challenge: to find a single instance where bitcoin works out cheaper than a fiat alternative. In case you need to ask... Nope.
Right, there's a bunch of circlejerking happening in /Bitcoin right now so I think it's time to cut through the bullshit one way or another.
Country to send money to.
The biggest remittance markets are China, Indian and the Philippines.
I believe that since /Bitcoin often gives the Philippines as an example of successful Bitcoin remittance then it is the perfect country to use in our challenge.
Country to send money from.
According to this wikipedia article Malaysia and Canada have the biggest expat Filipino communities. 900,000 and 500,000.
So I think we should do the calculations based on both countries.
The methodology
Most people are not paid in Bitcoin. This is a fact. So for our calculation you must start with fiat, and end in fiat. We're not doing these calculations based on future utility of Bitcoin (No, neo. I'm saying...), we're doing them on the current utility.
We will also be doing a bank to bank remittance, because that is nice an constant. We don't need to take into account pick up locations Bitcoin remittance allows and pick up locations normal remittance allows. They'll vary too much.
Time will also not be taken into account, as time doesn't actually matter when it comes to remittance. Now, Bitcoiners might shout about this particular rule but let me explain my logic behind this.
A foreign worker gets paid every Friday. They start the remittance process on the Friday and regardless of if it takes 0, 3, or 5 days their family back in their home country just needs to base their life around money coming in on remitters pay day + 0, 3, or 5 days. Time taken is of no real value when it comes to remittance. All that matters is that it consistently arrives on day x.
As such, any remittance services that take over 5 working days are to be ignored for the sake of this challenge.
The amount
The amount is going to be 25% of the average wage in each of the countries. This isn't extremely scientific because it doesn't particularly need to be, and the figures are hard to come by.
So 1826.75 MYR for Malaysia and 1,398 CAD for Canada.
Don't bother complaining about these, they're just examples.
Few more ground rules
  • We're going to be going from bank/bank card to bank regardless, so we're not interested in banking fees on either side. They will be the same regardless of Bitcoin or WU (for example)
  • It must be from local fiat to foreign fiat.. You can't palm off the conversion fee to the receivers bank to keep fees down.
  • Any remittance service can be used, as long as Bitcoin is involved for people fighting the Bitcoin corner and Bitcoin isn't used for people fighting the WU (or similar) corner.
  • You must go through the process and document all the fees for each. Fees to look out for are currency spreads, transaction fees on exchanges, etc

Finally a recent thread, but commendable all the same. Hodldown presents some research leading to facts overturning years of knowledge in the bitcoin wiki. Even us shills have been laughing at bitcoin's pathetic capability of 7 transactions per second. It turns out, we were out by at least a factor of 2:
The average number of transactions per block right now is: 665 transactions
The average block size is 0.372731752748842mb.
That means the average transaction is 0.00056049887mb. Which means 1mb of transactions (the limit) is 1784 transactions
Assuming a 10 minute block (a whole other can of worms) that means there is 10*60 seconds.
1784/600 isn't 7. It's a 2.97.
Bitcoin at a technical level can not handle even 3 transactions per second.

In one of the frequent bitcoin user invasions, PayingWithActualMone outlines why the "solution in search of a problem" isn't that great of a solution to much either.
On the transaction side: the Bitcoin community seems convinced that banks are ripping them off (which imo they are not), and that it can be fixed by applying some magicsauce over a transaction that is facilitated by banks regardless. So far in practice I haven't seen any evidence of the 'fast' 'cheap' and 'easy' transactions, like most recently with Mollie. They usually compare the fees of BTC>BTC transactions to the fees of Chase Mastercard > a fucking nomad in the Sahara (with consumer protection) to prove their point. The community also seems convinced that the entire world banks the way America does, not realizing that in Europe banking has been dirt cheap for years.
And the security... oh boy the security. Half the population can't manage to go without a virus for one year (not an actual statistic), and now you expect them to secure their coins? People are dumb as shit, and software is always one step behind the exploits. We could of course create Bitcoin banks, but then there isn't much left of the original idea.
On the 'intrinsic value' side: what the hell is wrong with people. If the underlying product is no good in any aspect, why is it worth much? Right now (that's like 5 years after introduction mind you) BTC is used in 3 types of transactions: Silk Road, SatoshiDice & extremely questionable transactions. It does its job well in that aspect, and that's all it will ever be. The community just turned the technology into a giant ponzi, and they don't care as long as they get paid. The people actually doing business in Bitcoin probably don't care about the price that much.

Someone who deleted their account, on the argument that merchant adoption is a cause of the price drop:
That's just an excuse butters use for the price going down.
There's no real difference between selling bitcoin for fiat and exchanging bitcoin for goods and services. Both are a form of sale of bitcoin, an expression of preference for something other than bitcoin.
If on balance, there's more flow of bitcoin into fiat, goods or services than there is a corresponding opposing flow, then it is simply the market expressing the view that bitcoin is overvalued. Therefore, the reduction in the value of bitcoin (as valued in fiat) is a sincere expression of the market's view of what the correct price for bitcoin is.
Think of an example: A true believer has 20 BTC. He exchanges 10 BTC with Dell for a whizzy server. Dell (or another intermediary) sell the 10 BTC at an exchange in return for fiat. The market price of BTC goes down.
The price goes down, simply because a true believer cut his bitcoin holding, he got out. He thought having a server now was worth more to him than 10 tickets to the moon. Which is an expression of a negative view of the future value of bitcoin. A simple "aggressive" sale in trading parlance.

A late entry from jstolfi. A concise description of the Satoshi/Bitcoin origin story .
My understanding is that "Satoshi" had been trying to solve the technical problem of convincing a bunch of anonymous, volunteers to maintain and protect a distributed ledger, with no central authority.
He thought that he had a solution, in the form of a protocol that included PoW, miner rewards, longest chain, etc. The solution seemed to work on paper; but, as a good scientist, he started an experiment in order to check whether it would also work in practice.
For that experiment to be meaningful, it would have been enough if the coin was mined for several years only by a few hundred computer nerds, with the cooperation of some friendly pizza places and bars.
The US$ price of the coin was not important to the experiment, and it was never meant to be a weapon for libertarians, a way to buy drugs or evade taxes, a competitor to credit cards or Western Union, a sound investment or item for day-trading. All those "goals" were tacked onto it afterwards.

bob237 comments on the the absurdity of coinbase and it's touted 'rebuy' scheme,
It gets even better than that, actually. A lot of bitcoiners don't like 'losing' bitcoin, and so coinbase added a popular 'repurchase bitcoin' feature that automatically debits your bank account to replenish the BTC in your coinbase account after a purchase.
The ultimate result then is that you pay coinbase fiat, they take their cut, and then send that fiat on to the merchant. All 'bitcoins' used in the middle of the transaction are not really bitcoins, but just abstractions in coinbase's internal [off-chain] accounting system.
It's a crap version of paypal, no consumer protection and a ton of fees hidden in the spread when you buy your chuck-e-cheese tokens from them.

saigonsquare explains why ubiquitous tipping isn't the the killer app that it has been touted as, and why bitcoiners may fail to grasp this
Most people understand that there are different sorts of interaction. There are purely social interactions, there are quid-pro-quo interactions, and there are market interactions. Mixing those up causes embarrassment and insult. I wouldn't try to pay my mother-in-law ten bucks for cooking Christmas dinner, and I certainly wouldn't try to pay her ten cents. If a waiter suggests I try the raspberry tart, I won't get away with offering to bake him some cookies next week in compensation; if an office mate suggests I have a slice of her birthday cake, I'll be insulted if she brings me a bill for it. If I spend an hour helping my friend move apartments and he thanks me, I'm fine; we're friends helping each other out. If he pays me two bucks, I'm insulted; he's canceled the social nature of the interaction and instead simply bought my labor for a fraction of its going rate. I'm up two bucks but down a friend.
Ancapspergers, not particularly understanding any sort of interaction more complicated than buying a cheeseburger at Wendy's, assume that all interactions are a form of market transaction, and set pricing accordingly. Normal humans get offended by a penny shaving, because it cancels the social nature of the interaction and turns it into a market transaction--and then informs the recipient that his contribution to the transaction was of negligible value.
submitted by occasionallyrude to Buttcoin [link] [comments]

How to buy Bitcoins with debit card or Paypal - ZERO fee's ... How to Buy and Sell Bitcoins Using Paypal - YouTube How to transfer Bitcoin to PayPal, without coinbase! - YouTube How to withdraw your Bitcoin via Security Bank Cardless ATM (Coins.ph) How to Register in Paypal Step by Step - Paypal to Bank ...

Wirex’s slick light-green debit card supports conversion from several major cryptos, has a native built-in utility token (WXT), and gives users 0.5% BTC on in-store purchases through its ... When it comes to Bitcoin and cryptocurrencies, the Philippines is one of those countries that are looking to promote innovation and boost adoption by way of favorable regulations and technological advancements. Recent developments in the Philippines’ Bitcoin scenario clearly indicate that adoption of the digital currency is only going to get better with time. How to buy bitcoin with PayPal in the Philippines Step-by-step instructions on how to buy bitcoin and other cryptos using PayPal in the Philippines. Tim Falk Updated Mar 1, 2020. Fact checked. Promoted. Crypto.com App. Buy BTC and 50+ other cryptos ; Pay by bank transfer, PayPal, credit or debit card; Take advantage of a wide range of extra features; Go to site. Navigate Cryptocurrency ... Although you can’t directly convert bitcoin to PayPal money, some of the exchange services will do this conversion for you. These exchanges act as an intermediate and thus making bitcoin to PayPal exchange possible. The most important bitcoin exchanges do not provide the service of exchanging bitcoins into USD or EUR and then making a fiat withdrawal to your PayPal account. Bitcoin Debit Card. Easily spend Bitcoin anywhere like cash. Bitnovo. Bitnovo has a prepaid debit card in Euros that can be recharged using Bitcoins instantly. View. Bitstamp. Bitstamp offers debit cards denominated in USD. Cards are charged with USD from bitcoin. View. Bitpay. Load dollars onto your BitPay card using any bitcoin wallet. Funds are ready to spend in seconds. View. Wirex. Global ...

[index] [22462] [1063] [12233] [27294] [10788] [7401] [49969] [14369] [8557] [25493]

How to buy Bitcoins with debit card or Paypal - ZERO fee's ...

FOR BUSINESS OR PROMOTIONAL INQUIRIES ( [email protected]) BUY BITCOINS WITH A CREDIT/DEBIT CARD 1) https://cash.me/$cashwithbob 2) https://buycoinn... Learn the best way how to buy bitcoin with paypal in 2019. You will learn how to start buying bitcoins with YOUR paypal account or debit card instantly with ... Get your FREE Wirex account here: https://wirexapp.com/r/moocharoo Once you are signed into to your verified wirex account you'll be able to buy all the bitc... We hope you enjoy this Paxful Tutorial On How To Buy Bitcoin With Paxful And Gift Cards And Debit Cards as well as other Payment methods such as credit cards, paypal and many more. Please " LIKE AND SUBSCRIBES " : https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCbKjxp2VqXAKQAHMlq-o-qQ?view_as=subscriber PAYPAL : www.paypal.com =====...

#